Redmond Speech & Language offers comprehensive evaluation and treatment of a broad array of speech and language disorders for both children and adults. The use of technology plays an important role in evaluation and treatment in our clinic. We are highly adept in the use of iPad technology to aid communication across disorders. We actively seek to collaborate with families and other professionals to effectively meet each individual’s needs by ensuring the use of evidence based practice. If you are a new client, be sure to check out our new client, insurance information, and online resources pages.

  • Apraxia is a significant difficulty in motor planning. In a speech apraxia, this means that there is not necessarily any difficulty with muscle strength or any structural abnormalities.  There may not be any phonological processing errors. However, there are errors in coordination.  This often results in inconsistent errors in speech sound production and highly unintelligible speech.
  • Click here for more information about childhood apraxia of speech.
  • Articulation: the use of motor movements (coordination of the muscles) and articulators (teeth, lips, gums, palates, etc) along with voice production and resonance to produce speech sounds.
  • Phonological Disorders: patterns of errors in the production of TYPES of speech sounds (those produced using the teeth vs. both lips vs. the soft palate, etc.) that persist past the expected age of speech and language development.
  • Click here for more information about speech sound disorders.
  • Use of high or low tech devices to assist (augment) existing verbal communication, or provide the ability to communicate using language where it does not yet exist (alternative communication).
  • Click here for more information about AAC.
  • Attention
  • Memory
  • Executive functions
  • Processing/processing speed
  • Visuospatial skills
  • Organization/planning
  • Click here for more information on cognitive deficits caused by Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
  • Muscle weakness affecting the ability to speak clearly that can be the result of brain injury, cerebral palsy, degenerative diseases, or other syndromes.
  • Click here for more information about dysarthria.
  • Expressive language: effectively communicating wants, needs, feelings and demonstrating academic competence using age appropriate morphology (word structure), syntax (sentence structure), and semantics (vocabulary use).
  • Receptive language: comprehension of language demonstrated by the ability to follow directions containing multiple steps and/or language concepts, answer yes/no and complex “WH” questions, etc.
  • Click here for more information about developmental speech and language disorders.
  • Difficulty regulating the process of taking food or fluids into the mouth, chewing/controlling the bolus (food/fluid), and safely swallowing without aspiration.
  • Click here for more information about feeding and swallowing disorders in children.
  • Talking in some situations/places, but not in others, persisting for more than one month and affecting the person’s ability to participate in activities of daily living.
  • Click here for more information about selective mutism.
  • Social use of verbal language for problem solving, self-advocacy, conversation skills, emotional regulation, “others” thinking, etc. Also, involving the use of non-verbal language (e.g. body language, facial expression, understanding/use of prosody for humor/sarcasm, etc.).
  • Click here for more information about social communication disorders.
  • Stuttering: Disruption in the fluent production of connected speech.
  • Cluttering: Dysfluencies that don’t follow the typical pattern of stuttering and are characterized by abnormally rapid and/or irregular rate.
  • Click for more information about stuttering and cluttering.
  • Vocal cord dysfunction (VCD)
  • Vocal nodules, lesions etc
  • Hypophonia
  • Dysphonia
  • Chronic laryngitis
  • Click here for more information about voice disorders.